Human Resource Advisors & Managers

  • CASE MANAGEMENT 1 - MENTAL WELLBEING IN THE WORKPLACE
  • CASE MANAGEMENT 2 - PHYSICAL WELLBEING IN THE WORKPLACE
  • BECOMING SELF EMPLOYED
  • RISK ASSESSOR - Display Screen Equipment (DSE)
  • OH NEEDS OF OFFICES, CALL CENTRES & FOR HOME OR REMOTE WORKERS
  • MANUAL HANDLING & ERGONOMIC RISK TOOLS

Who is this course for:

This one-day course is suitable for all delegates (e.g. OH, HR & safety) who are interested in gaining a better understanding of mental wellbeing in the workplace. It will provide underpinning knowledge of the commonest mental health conditions, recognition and their treatments including potential effects on attendance, presenteeism and performance.

It aims to provide information to enable practitioners to reflect on their personal level of competency in this area and gain new knowledge or a reassuring update. It will also review approaches that may be appropriate to use in their day-to-day practice or that can be negotiated with OH services (whether in-house or contracted out) and/or employee assistance providers (EAPs). This may help practitioners proactively influence workers, teams and organisations from strategic level down to include personal and team risk assessment, manager training and tailored health education activities for example.

This provision offers a rich learning environment by including multidisciplinary delegates. It may highlight the differing expectations of the OH, safety & HR advisor, the employer & line manager as well those of the employee.

Trainers:

The training team are experienced occupational health & therapy practitioners with training and management experience who have worked in a variety of workplaces placing differing demands on mental performance including emergency services, military, safeguarding, higher risk and safety critical work including horse racing, aviation, utilities, logistics and warehousing, heavy manufacturing, construction, retail, food & drink production, local government, NHS, social care, education & service sectors.

Why attend:

OH, HR & safety practitioners may have areas of specialist knowledge but they need to be able to respond appropriately to the perceived needs of their colleagues and organisation from a mental wellbeing perspective (whether an OH service is present or not.) In relation to attendance the focus is often on the worker’s self or fit-note reported ‘label’ whereas a more helpful approach is identifying what elements of their substantive job role that they can or cannot do and why; barriers to return to work and what can be done differently to enable performance and attendance.

Consideration also needs to be given to the potential impact on end service or processes or other people as applicable. The risk assessment process tool enables the application of a principle-based approach which can also be beneficial in providing evidence of positive employment relations, H&S and Equality Act requirements including communication, identification and implementation of reasonable adjustments and capability over time.

What may be covered (indicative content)

Overview:

  • What is the brain and how are we wired to behave, remember and concentrate?
  • How does the brain and body store and process day to day and emotional events
  • Why is sleep important and what is the role of dreaming?
  • The depressed vs stressed vs anxious vs grieving vs moody vs exhausted employee
  • Brief overview – psychotic and neurotic conditions
  • The moody, poor performing employee, chronic embitterment
  • Post-traumatic stress
  • Panic attacks and learning to breathe
  • Anger
  • What is normal? Coping responses to accidents, redundancy, sudden death in the workplace
  • Human responses to witnessing or victim in an accidents, verbal or physical assault, death
  • Practitioner self-care and compassion fatigue – becoming more aware of own physical, mental and energetic bodies. Self-protection of own well-being. Daily practice suggestions

Clinical practice:

  • Recognising behavioural change and when you have a problem
  • History taking what is essential and what is nice to have
  • Assessment tools and their use by the GP and/or OH practitioner
  • Fitness for work, the risk assessment process and recommendations
  • Benefits of OH referral and / or EAP (manager or self-referral)
  • Use of EAPs for talking therapies; learning about symptoms and how to manage them

Quick pointers:

  • Setting expectations – how do EAPs work? Educating workers – telephone assessments and group lectures by EAPs or local NHS mental wellbeing services. How to get the best from it?
  • What is reasonable for employers to be able to expect following telephone counselling, face-to-face support or online CBT?
  • Best practice – NICE (National Institute of Clinical Excellence) guidance and current NHS provision via GP, self-referral and community psychiatric, mental wellbeing, drugs & alcohol services. Typical education and treatment processes
  • Research base – medication and /or non-medication therapies, role of nutrition, exercise, smoking, alcohol, drugs and legal highs
  • Alternative thinking and research base – worker and organisation responsibilities for shifting focus from unease, distress, depression to happiness, awareness, mindfulness
  • Suicide risk

Signposting:

  • sleep resources
  • approaches that all and managers can practice at home
  • identifying resource appropriateness for different gender and ages to promote engagement
  • Further reading – book and resource recommendations

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Who is this course for:

This one-day course is suitable for all delegates (OH, HR & safety) who are interested in gaining a better understanding of physical health conditions and wellbeing in the workplace. It will provide underpinning knowledge of the common health conditions that may affect performance and/or attendance at work and potential support required in the workplace either through best practice or reasonable adjustments under the Equality Act. Typical conditions that may be covered include:

  • diabetes (both diet and insulin controlled)
  • asthma and COPD
  • migraine and headache
  • women’s health
  • HIV
  • irritable bowel syndrome, crohns and colitis
  • epilepsy and seizures
  • multiple sclerosis
  • general aches and pains, upper limbs disorders and osteo and rheumatoid arthritis
  • angina, heart attack, stroke and circulatory problems
  • sensory problems including vision and hearing
  • cancer
  • mobility problems

It aims to provide information to enable practitioners to reflect on their personal level of competency in this area and gain new knowledge or a reassuring update. This may help practitioners proactively influence workers, teams and organisations from strategic level down to include personal and team risk assessment, manager training and tailored health education activities for example.

This provision offers a rich learning environment by including multidisciplinary delegates. It may highlight the differing expectations of the OH, safety & HR advisor, the employer & line manager as well those of the employee.

Trainers:

The training team are experienced occupational health practitioners with training and management experience who have worked in a variety of workplaces placing differing demands on physical ability including emergency services, military, safeguarding, higher risk and safety critical work including horse racing, aviation, utilities, logistics and warehousing, heavy manufacturing, construction, retail, food & drink production, local government, NHS, social care, education & service sectors.

Why attend:

In relation to attendance the employer’s focus is often on the worker’s self or fit-note reported “label” whereas a more helpful approach is identifying what elements of their substantive job role that they can or cannot do and why; barriers to return to work as well as what can be done differently to enable performance and attendance.

Consideration also needs to be given to the potential impact on end service or processes or other people as applicable. The risk assessment process tool enables the application of a principle-based approach which can also be beneficial in providing evidence of positive employment relations, H&S and Equality Act requirements including communication, identification and implementation of reasonable adjustments and capability over time.

Clinical practice:

  • History taking what is essential and what is nice to have
  • Functional assessment
  • Fitness for work, the risk assessment process and recommendations
  • Benefits of OH referral and / or to other allied health professionals
  • Worker and manager education

Note: This workshop covers physical wellbeing only. The ‘case management – mental wellbeing in the workplace’ is a complimentary workshop, which may be of interest and usually runs on consecutive days.

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Who is this course for:

This one-day course is suitable for those who are considering or are in the process of becoming a self-employed occupational health (OH), safety or HR professional. With the demise of the government small business support organisation ‘Business Link’ a few years ago there is differing coverage of new start-up and SME (small and medium enterprise) business growth support across the country. Post-course follow-up support though individual and/or group mentoring or other provision can be requested as needed.

Trainers:

The training team are experienced practitioners who run their own businesses (sole trader and limited). They have a variety of professional backgrounds including nursing, therapy and/or safety with training and management experience including for example, sales & marketing, networking, needs analysis, risk management, budgeting, creating and responding to tenders, customer and contract management and using contractors. They have experience within a variety of sectors including industry, utilities, heavy manufacturing, aviation, horse racing, food & drink production, warehousing & distribution, local government, fire service, police force, NHS, social care, education, insurance and other service sectors. Come and learn from their and other delegate’s experiences.

Why attend:

Becoming self-employed is an exciting but daunting career step to take. The setting up of a business whether sole trader or other such as limited is relatively easy to complete in practice but that is just the beginning and there are many factors that you need to consider to identify whether self-employment is right for you or an option you can start to work towards either now or in the future.

What may be covered (overview & indicative content):

  • What transferrable skills, knowledge, attitudes, training, experience and competence do I have?
  • What do I need and how can that gap be filled?
  • Is self-employment right for me? What are the benefits and downsides? Working from home?
  • What type of business & legal structure is right for me?
  • Choosing and protecting your business name
  • Legal and tax considerations for new businesses – contracts, intellectual property, IR35 assessment
  • Business planning – why this is key to success
  • Market and competitor analysis – Finding space in a niche market
  • Financial forecasting; maximizing and building cash-flow
  • Calculating day rates and covering costs, use of retainers
  • Choosing bank accounts and fees, accounting software, invoices and late payments
  • Sources of start-up funding for operating, salary and equipment costs
  • Use of IT, data protection, email and storage of confidential health and medical information
  • Insurance needs
  • Planning ahead for when things will go wrong e.g. if you are ill or injured and hard times
  • Meeting your personal needs and career development, delegation both now and in the future

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Who is this course for:

This one-day course is suitable for all delegates (e.g. OH, HR & safety) who are interested in helping improve worker comfort and productivity through ensuring compliance with the display screen equipment legislation requirements, including the organisational and individual DSE risk assessment process.

It aims to provide information to enable practitioners to reflect on their personal level of competency in this area and gain new knowledge or a reassuring update. It will also review approaches that may be appropriate to use in their day-to-day practice or that can be negotiated with OH services (whether in-house or contracted out). This may help practitioners proactively influence workers, teams and organisations from strategic level down to include organisational planning, line manager and user responsibilities and tailored DSE user toolbox talk educational activities for example.

Trainers:

The training team are experienced occupational health & safety practitioners whom have specialised in musculoskeletal disorders and have training and management experience. They have worked and advised organisations and users who work within the office, home-based or remote working situations.

Why attend:

To perform well at work individuals need to be comfortable at their desks. Musculoskeletal disorders are common in staff who spend much of the day sitting either at their desk or driving cars and can be prevented and healed through appropriate setup, postural advice, education in relation to pain control, active treatment and fitness requirements.

Overview:

  • Implementing a robust DSE assessment program – considerations for in-house assessors
  • Pros and cons of e-programs
  • Line managers, assessors and user responsibilities
  • Identifying higher and lower risk users including consideration to work type
  • The DSE risk assessment process and risk reduction
  • Increasing comfort at work through enabling more neutral posture at the joints
  • Modern chair design
  • Desk design – shape and effects on posture; sit-stand desks
  • Selection of input devices
  • Myth Busters and common setup errors – monitor height, feet on floor
  • Case studies – problem-solving – headaches, joint pain, pregnancy, environmental issues
  • DSE user toolbox talks and body mapping

 Note: The ‘OH needs of offices, call centres and home/remote workers’ is complimentary to this course. It usually runs on consecutive days and its focus is on the wider aspects of supporting the needs of this group of workers from an organisational as well as individual perspective. Please see the OH Learning Hub website for more details.

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Who is this course for:

This one-day course is suitable for all delegates (OH, HR & safety) who are interested in gaining a better understanding of the occupational health needs of staff who are in offices, call centres, designated home-based or remote workers.

It will provide underpinning knowledge of the hazards and risks associated with working in these environments. It aims to provide information to enable practitioners to reflect on their personal level of competency in this area and gain new knowledge or a reassuring update. This may help practitioners proactively influence workers, teams and organisations from strategic level down to include personal and team risk assessment, manager training and tailored health education activities for example.

Trainers:

The training team are experienced occupational health practitioners with training and management experience who have worked in a variety of workplaces placing differing demands on physical ability including emergency services, military, safeguarding, higher risk and safety critical work including horse racing, aviation, utilities, logistics and warehousing, heavy manufacturing, construction, retail, food & drink production, local government, NHS, social care, education & service sectors.

Why attend:

Workers who are predominantly office-based are generally considered to be working in lower risk environments. However, in reality supporting this group provides its own set of health and safety related challenges and associated knowledge in the following areas including:

  • trends in workstation and chair designs
  • considerations for hot desking
  • implementing a get standing campaign
  • environmental considerations in the workplace – light, noise, space, temperature
  • identifying work-related symptoms including mental wellbeing and isolation
  • increasing comfort levels in workers who are sitting for long periods – office and car drivers
  • meeting the needs of home-based workers
  • meeting the needs of sales and remote-based workers without a base
  • equipment trends including smart phones, tablets and laptops & foreseeable health risks
  • use of voice handwriting recognition tools
  • voice care – warming up the voice and prevention of vocal strain
  • loud noise exposures and risks of acoustic shock in telephone users and call centres

Note: The ‘DSE (display screen equipment) risk assessor’ workshop content is complimentary to this course. It usually runs on consecutive days and its focus is on the implementation of an organisational DSE assessment program and completion of DSE user risk assessments as well as selection of alternative data input equipment such as keyboards and mice.

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Who is this course for:

This one-day course is suitable for all delegates (e.g. OH, HR & safety) who are interested in reducing the risk of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in the workplace. It will provide basic underpinning knowledge of the commonest types of musculoskeletal injury and their causes. We will review the manual handling risk assessment process and other tools for assessing body posture including REBA/RULA, ART plus body mapping and the Borg comfort scale. This information can feed into organisational strategy for risk reduction, enable risk assessments to be more proactive and complement team and individual educational approaches aimed at the worker to reduce cumulative pain and injury.

Trainers:

The training team are experienced occupational health & safety practitioners whom have specialised in musculoskeletal disorders and have training and management experience. They have worked and advised organisations and workers within a variety of professions and environments.

Why attend:

Cumulative musculoskeletal disorders are prevalent in the workplace and frequently tolerated by the worker as ‘part of the job’. Relatively minor improvements in body postures and/or different ways of working can reduce strain and tension. If not acted upon in a timely manner chronic pain and reduced range of movement may result affecting mobility and capability at work. Many MSDs can be prevented and healed through robust risk assessment, postural advice, education in relation to pain control, active treatment and job specific strength and flexibility requirements.

Overview (indicative content):

  • What is manual handling (MH)?
  • Manual handling risk factors and the MH risk assessment process (generic and specific)
  • Identifying higher and lower risk tasks through assessing detailed worker reality of work posture through observation using REBA, RULA, ART and perception through body mapping and comfort scales
  • Line managers, assessors and worker responsibilities
  • Decreasing risk of injury through enabling more neutral posture at the joints
  • Risks associated from manual activity and PPE use
  • Myth Busters – there are no maximum handling weights in the legislation
  • Case studies e.g. repetitive work in the post room, machinists and shipping container loading

 Note: The ‘DSE – display screen equipment risk assessor and OH needs of offices, call centres and home/remote workers’ courses may offer complimentary ergonomics related knowledge to other groups in the workplace. 

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